Rolling Art Exhibition

March 7, 2018 General, SacRT in Community

Rolling Art Exhibition

The Sacramento Regional Transit District (SacRT), in partnership with the Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission (SMAC), is bringing rolling art to the light rail lines.

On Monday, March 12, SacRT will debut four light rail vehicles that have been wrapped with art designed by four local artists: Ruby Chacón, Linda Nunes, Kerri Warner and Donine Wellman. Chacón’s art represents intergenerational, under-represented, and gender-balanced people. Nunes’ artwork is a surreal and condensed landscape environment created with impenetrable vegetation, sunny colors, and subtle texture. Warner wanted her art to be colorful, whimsical and relatable to the general population of Sacramento; she depicts groups of dogs gazing at the night sky. Wellman chose bright and cheery colors with a countdown as the train arrives in a whimsical city

The artists will be available at 10 a.m. on Monday, March 12 to share their inspirations during the exhibition at the 7th & Richards/Township 9 Station located at 7th Street and Richards Boulevard in the River District.

Through SMAC, a committee selected the four artists out of 29 candidates based on their diverse designs. Each unique in style, color and design, the artists’ renderings were transferred to vinyl and then applied using a standard fabrication and installation method to attach to the light rail vehicles. Wrapping trains is an efficient and cost-effective way to improve the exterior of older light rail trains, and can last up to seven years.

Rolling Art Light Rail Artwork

Ruby Chacón

My goals were to create spaces of belonging and build community through art. The people and the symbols in the design “Movimiento” reflect these intentions. Centered on the concept of motion, each person expresses this through gesture, or symbolically represents it. They are all linked together by the butterflies that not only represent motion, but also represent strength and perseverance.

Ollin, an Aztec symbol for movement, reminds of our Indigenous forms of storytelling. The symbols in this piece are all life affirming and are intended to uplift our communities. Each person ties to the next, together “as one,” as community.

Linda Nunes

I’m drawn by the powerful impact of nature’s aesthetics and pulse whether in fractal formation or ripples in a pond. The “New Land” artwork is a surreal and condensed landscape environment created with impenetrable vegetation, sunny colors, subtle texture and otherworld type orbs. With its overgrowth of tiny multi-colored leaves, the landscape whispers the possibility of hope and new life while small winged creatures flit among the branches and bright celestial spheres.

Kerri Warner

The aspect ratio of the trains was the driving force behind my final design choice. I wanted the art to be colorful, whimsical and relatable to the general population of Sacramento. 

So why dogs? Dogs were the first domesticated animals, symbolically they are associated with loyalty and vigilance, often acting as a guardian and protector. Dogs can bring people together. For the RT project I depicted groups of dogs gazing at the night sky. I hope when people see the trains they will smile, be curious about what the dogs are looking at and understand that no matter who we are or where we are in the world we all look upon the same stars.

Donine Wellman

I chose (with the help of the RT panel’s input) bright and cheery colors for my RT wrap and the theme “Here Comes the Train,” with a countdown as it comes into a whimsical city. With its uplifting sayings, collage sun made with a California road map, and XOXO on the front of the train (one of my trademarks), my hope is that this colorful train will bring joy to all who see it and ride on it.